Tekst Større | Mindre
Gå til innhold

Søk

Velg språk

NORSK DESIGNRÅD

Lær profesjonell designledelse

Du er her:



Design that makes a difference

The Norwegian projects that will be showcased in London are all the 7 category winners of the Innovation Award for Universal Design together with the two design research projects with NorDan and Think electric car, carried out in cooperation with The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, and last but not least Norwegian railway`s universally designed train Flirt, recipient of the Award for Design Excellence.

 

People-centred projects from Norway and the UK. Exhibition at the Royal College of Art, London 19 – 25 April.

Royal College of Art to host exhibition of 20 people-centred projects from Norway and the UK

Exhibition: 19-26 April 2013 (free entry)
10am - 5.30pm daily (closes 1pm 26 April)

Demonstrating the benefits of people-centred design thinking, the exhibition supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy in London showcases 20 projects ranging from passenger trains and hotel chains to government websites, voting systems and community-led initiatives. Together they provide a snapshot of the developing practice of socially inclusive design – design that makes a difference.

Drawing on a history of collaboration between the UK and Norway, the exhibition builds on a book published in 2010 by the Norwegian Design Council with the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design at the Royal College of Art. Innovating with People: The Business of Inclusive Design advocated the need for an inclusive approach in business. Three years on, this exhibition looks at companies, designers and initiatives that are actively engaging with this idea.

As an approach, inclusive design works most effectively when activated at all levels – within local communities and neighbourhoods, within business organisations and through public services. These projects represent a cross-section of work that puts people first, meets social need, influences business practice and effects positive change.

This exhibition is not just about inclusive design, it's really about good and effective design. It shows how design can make the world work better. For me it's inspirational and generates great optimism about our future. It's a 'must-see' for any designer who wants to make a real difference.

Michael Wolff

The exhibition also maps a shift in the way inclusive design is being applied. People are not simply viewed as the subject of design research, but as the authors of their own solutions. All the projects see people as central to the design process, as participants, as commentators, evaluators and even instigators.

Defined in 2000 by the UK Government as ‘a process whereby designers ensure that their products and services address the needs of the widest possible audience’, inclusive design also links to ideas around social equality enshrined in the Nordic model of democratic governance. In 2005, 16 Norwegian government ministries committed to an Action Plan implementing inclusive design in Norway by 2025, with cross-sector collaboration playing a key role.

The exhibition is supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy in the UK and reflects its interest in promoting cultural links between the UK and Norway and demonstrating the value of design thinking. It is presented by the Norwegian Design Council and the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design at the RCA, building on a seven-year partnership that includes conferences, publications, design projects and executive education.

 

The exhibited projects

BUSINESS-DRIVEN
Scandic Oslo Airport Hotel (NO)
With its new hotel at Oslo Gardermoen airport, the Scandic hotel chain takes a lead in showing how to make inclusive design happen in the tourism and travel sector.

Tuva cutlery (NO)
Hardanger Bestikk made ‘Design for All’ a priority when developing a new cutlery design. Grip styles and dexterity emerged as a strong focus when users became involved.

Think Electric Car (NO)
Initiated by the Norwegian Design Council in cooperation with the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, this joint project introduced window manufacturer NorDan to innovation through people-centred research.

NorDan Domestic Windows (NO)
This joint project initiated by the Norwegian Design Council in cooperation with the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, introduced window manufacturer NorDan to innovation through people-centred research.

BT Big Button Phone (UK)
The iconic Big Button range of inclusively designed phones for people of all ages and abilities highlights BT’s longstanding interest in inclusive design.

Nestlé Inclusive Packaging (UK)
This project rethinks packaging design by focusing on principles for inclusive design and the resultant corporate change to the innovation process.


COMMUNITY-CENTRED
Weather forecast website www.yr.no (NO)
These content-rich pages were the first in the world to provide user friendly large-scale detailed hourly forecasts, and they are still world leaders in presentation and communication of weather forecasts.

Margarinfabrikken kindergarten (NO)
A historic, protected building under Norwegian law  presented unique challenges; the result however demonstrates how a restoration project can be enhanced by universal design ideas.

Ode (UK)
The ode system, now installed in over 50 care homes, encourages residents experiencing dementia to eat by using scent to reconnect people with food.

Fixperts.org (UK)
An innovative community network which links designers with older and disabled people in their local neighbourhoods resulting in quick interventions that positively change everyday life.

Community Lighting Scheme (UK)
This project proposes a more sustainable lighting strategy for under-lit pockets of the city and tests a new system on a London estate, proposing a fundamental rethink of how we light urban public spaces at night.

The Amazings (UK)
The Amazings is a new service that allows elders with amazing life experience to transfer skills to younger people by holding classes and courses.


PUBLIC-FACING
Government Voting System – Blanke Ark (NO)
Blanke Ark is a universally designed election system that makes it easier for everyone to participate in democracy by reconsidering the ways that votes are cast.

NSB Flirt Norwegian public trains (NO)
This project used inclusive design as a premise for the nation’s new train design. Involving several organisations for disabled people in all the different design phases resulted in accessible solutions for everyone.

Passenger boats in Rogaland (NO)
Blanke Ark is a universally designed election system that makes it easier for everyone to participate in democracy by reconsidering the ways that votes are cast.

gov.uk (UK)
This new digital public services portal is designed with citizens and services in mind, and has seen an increase in the use of on line services. A Design Museum Designs of the Year finalist.

South Bank Riverside Walk (UK)
This redevelopment of London’s South Bank for the 2012 Olympic Games shows how historic areas can become more accessible whilst still maintaining their character.

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park (UK)
This looks at the inclusive design legacy of the Olympic Park as it is developed into lifetime homes and venues beyond “the most accessible Games ever”.

UK Emergency Ambulance (UK)
A flagship project for the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design resulting in a totally new interior for the emergency ambulance co-designed with paramedics and clinical staff.

Schandorff’s Urban Public Space (NO)
This new winding walkway and modern park in central Oslo now provides a good social space convenient for all -push chairs, bikes or wheelchairs, and with allergy friendly plantation.

Seminar

A short seminar will be held at Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, London SW72EU, Lecture Theatre One 19. April at 3pm - 4.30 pm, with keynote speaker Michael Wolff, UK Government Inclusive Design Adviser as well as British and Norwegian presenters. To be followed by Private View at 4.30 pm - 7.30 pm opened by HE Ambassador of Norway Mr. Kim Traavik at the Henry Moore Galleries. Please register by e-mail to karolina.raczynska@network.rca.ac.uk (limited seating).

Programme

Friday 19. April, 3pm - 4.15pm
3pm:
Welcome: Prof. Jeremy Myerson, Director, Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, RCA
Introduction: Jan R. Stavik, Managing Director, Norwegian Design Council
Keynote: Michael Wolff, UK Government Inclusive Design Adviser
Presentations:
Norway: Øyvind Grønli: Award winning designer of Blanke Ark, Norwegian Government voting system
UK: Ben Terrett, UK Government Digital Service
Project introductions:
Onny Eikhaug, Programme Leader, Innovation for All, Norwegian Design Council
Rama Gheerawo, Deputy Director, Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, RCA
4.15pm: end
4.30: Private View starts
Opened by the Ambassador of Norway HE Mr Kim Traavik

Partners

The Norwegian Design Council and The Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, Royal College of Art

Supported by: Royal Norwegian Embassy in London

 

 

PUBLISERT 01.03.2013 11:28